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Brown family blast prosecutor handling of case

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) -- Attorneys for Michael Brown's family on Tuesday vowed to push for federal charges against the Ferguson police officer who killed the unarmed 18-year-old, and they renewed their calls for peace following a night of violent protests in which several businesses were burned to the ground.


The attorneys said the grand jury process was rigged from the start to clear the white officer, Darren Wilson, in the Aug. 9 shooting death of Brown, who was black. And they criticized everything from the types of evidence St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch presented to the jury to the way it was presented and the timing of the grand jury's decision. They also said they hope that a federal civil rights investigation will result in charges against Wilson.


"We said from the very beginning that the decision of this grand jury was going to be the direct reflection of the presentation of the evidence by the prosecutor's office," said attorney Anthony Gray, who suggested McCulloch presented some testimony, including from witnesses who did not see the shooting, to discredit the process.


Meanwhile, Gov. Jay Nixon ordered hundreds of more National Guardsmen into Ferguson to help local law enforcement keep order in the St. Louis suburb. Twelve commercial buildings in Ferguson were burned down during the protests that erupted after the grand jury's decision was announced Monday night, and firefighters responded to blazes at eight others, Assistant Fire Chief Steve Fair said. Other businesses were looted, and 12 vehicles also were torched.


There were 61 arrests in Ferguson overnight, many for burglary and trespassing, and 21 in St. Louis, where protesters broke some store windows along South Grand Avenue.


Jon Belmar, chief of the St. Louis County police, said that unless his agency could bring in 10,000 officers, "I don't think we can prevent folks who really are intent on destroying a community."


At least 18 people were injured and sought treatment at area hospitals, including someone who was shot and was recovering Tuesday at SSM DePaul Health Center. The hospital didn't give any details about the shooting. Two other people were admitted to Barnes-Jewish Hospital for undisclosed injuries. Everyone else was treated and released.


Brown's parents made public calls for peace in the run-up to Monday's announcement, and on Tuesday, their representatives again stressed that those setting fires and engaging in violence were not on Michael Brown's side.


There were several protests during the day Tuesday, including one in Clayton, where the grand jury met, in which clergy members and others blocked morning traffic for several hours and another in downtown St. Louis where demonstrators swarmed the steps of a federal courthouse and stopped traffic. Nobody was arrested at the Clayton protest and at least four people were arrested at the one in St. Louis.


Many area districts cancelled classes out of concern for the safety of students traveling to and from school.


The grand jury's decision means that Wilson will not face any state criminal charges for killing Brown, whose death inflamed deep racial tensions between many black Americans and police.


Attorneys for Brown's family said they hope that an ongoing federal civil rights investigation will lead to charges. For that to happen, though, investigators would need to satisfy a rigorous standard of proof in order to mount a prosecution. The department also has launched a broad probe into the Ferguson Police Department, looking for patterns of discrimination.


Regardless of the outcome of those investigations, Brown's family could also file a wrongful-death lawsuit against Wilson.

Wilson's lawyers issued a statement praising the decision and saying the officer, who has remained out of the public eye since the shooting, is grateful to his supporters.


"Law enforcement personnel must frequently make split-second and difficult decisions," the lawyers wrote. "Officer Wilson followed his training and followed the law."


McCulloch, seeming defensive, spoke for 45 minutes on Monday while explaining the grand jury's decision. He said the jury of nine whites and three blacks met on 25 separate days over three months and heard more than 70 hours of testimony from about 60 witnesses, including three medical examiners and experts on blood, toxicology and firearms. He repeatedly cited what he said were inconsistencies and erroneous witness accounts, and he never once mentioned that Brown was unarmed.


As McCulloch read his statement, Michael Brown's mother, Lesley McSpadden, sat atop a vehicle listening to a broadcast of the announcement. When she heard the decision, she burst into tears and began screaming before being whisked away by supporters. The crowd with her erupted in anger, converging on the barricade where police in riot gear were standing and pelting them with objects, including a bullhorn. The officers stood their ground.


The protest became more chaotic, with protesters looting and setting fire to businesses and vehicles, including at least two police cars. Officers eventually lobbed tear gas from inside armored vehicles to disperse crowds.


Shortly after the announcement, authorities released more than 1,000 pages of grand jury documents, including Wilson's testimony.


Wilson told jurors that he initially encountered Brown and a friend walking in a street and, when he told them to move to a sidewalk, Brown responded with an expletive. Wilson then noticed that Brown had a handful of cigars, "and that's when it clicked for me," he said, referring to a radio report minutes earlier of a robbery at a nearby convenience store.


Wilson said he asked a dispatcher to send additional police, and then backed his vehicle up in front of Brown and his friend. As he tried to open the door, Wilson said Brown slammed it back shut.


The officer said he pushed Brown with the door and Brown hit him in the face, leading him to draw his gun and threaten to shoot Brown. He said Brown grabbed the gun and, fearing for his life, he fired it. Brown then fled and Wilson gave chase. At some point, Brown turned around to face the officer.


Witness accounts were conflicted about whether Brown walked, stumbled or charged back toward Wilson before he was fatally wounded, McCulloch said. There were also differing accounts of how or whether Brown's hands were raised. His body fell about 153 feet from Wilson's vehicle.


The August shooting heightened tensions in the predominantly black suburb that is patrolled by an overwhelmingly white police force. As Brown's body lay for hours in the center of a residential street, an angry crowd of onlookers gathered. Rioting and looting occurred the following night, and police responded with armored vehicles and tear gas.


Protests continued for weeks - often peacefully, but sometimes turning violent, with demonstrators throwing rocks and Molotov cocktails and police firing smoke canisters, tear gas and rubber bullets. Nixon briefly summoned the National Guard.


Ashon Bumaka, 46, of nearby Black Jack, surveyed the damage Tuesday morning.


"As you can see, it's sad man ... this don't look like a city in the United States. Right now this looks like some foreign area that the government has betrayed the people."


---

Link to grand jury documents: http://hosted.ap.org/specials/interactives/-documents/ferguson-shooting/ .

---

Associated Press writers Alan Scher Zagier in Clayton, Andale Gross and Jim Suhr in Ferguson and Catherine Lucey in Des Moines, Iowa, contributed to this report. Follow David A. Lieb at: https://twitter.com/DavidALieb .

© 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policyand Terms of Use.

Tuesday morning in Ferguson reveals extent of damage following grand jury decision

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) — Chaos returned to the streets of Ferguson after a grand jury declined to indict a white police officer in the death of Michael Brown — a decision that enraged protesters who set fire to buildings and cars and looted businesses in the area where the unarmed, black 18-year-old was fatally shot.

Stay with KFDM and CBS News for the latest on the aftermath in Ferguson.

Smoke billowed from some businesses Tuesday morning and shattered glass covered the sidewalks in front of others, but the streets in Ferguson were mostly clear.

Monday night's destruction appeared to be much worse than protests after August's shootings, with more than a dozen businesses badly damaged or destroyed. Authorities reported hearing hundreds of gunshots, which for a time prevented fire crews from fighting the flames.

There were 61 arrests in Ferguson overnight, many for burglary and trespassing, St. Louis County Police spokesman Brian Schellman said. St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay said there were 21 arrests in the city, where some protesters broke business windows along South Grand Avenue.

Jon Belmar, chief of the St. Louis County police, said that unless his agency could bring in 10,000 officers, "I don't think we can prevent folks who really are intent on destroying a community."

The grand jury's decision means that Officer Darren Wilson, who is white, will not face any state criminal charges for killing Brown, whose death inflamed deep racial tensions between many black Americans and police.

"They are the only people that have heard and examined every witness and every piece of evidence," he said, adding that the jurors "poured their hearts and soul into this process."

In the first flash of unrest after the grand jury announcement, Belmar said he told officers to back off, suggesting they handle the situation as if it were a festival or baseball game. But the situation quickly "spun out of control," as protesters looted businesses and set fire to numerous vehicles, including at least two police cars. Officers eventually lobbed tear gas from inside armored vehicles to disperse crowds.

As McCulloch read his statement, Michael Brown's mother, Lesley McSpadden, sat atop a vehicle listening to a broadcast of the announcement. When she heard the decision, she burst into tears and began screaming before being whisked away by supporters.

The crowd with her erupted in anger, converging on the barricade where police in riot gear were standing. They pushed down the barricade and began pelting police with objects, including a bullhorn. Officers stood their ground.

The prosecutor also was critical of the media, saying "the most significant challenge" for his office was a "24-hour news cycle and an insatiable appetite for something — for anything — to talk about."

McCulloch never mentioned that Brown was unarmed when he was killed.

Brown's family released a statement saying they were "profoundly disappointed" but asked that the public "channel your frustration in ways that will make a positive change. We need to work together to fix the system that allowed this to happen."

Shortly after the announcement, authorities released more than 1,000 pages of grand jury documents, including Wilson's testimony.

Wilson said he asked a dispatcher to send additional police, and then backed his vehicle up in front of Brown and his friend. As he tried to open the door, Wilson said Brown slammed it back shut.

The officer said he pushed Brown with the door and Brown hit him in the face. Wilson told grand jurors he was thinking: "What do I do not to get beaten inside my car."

"I drew my gun," Wilson told the grand jury. "I said, 'Get back or I'm going to shoot you.'

"He immediately grabs my gun and says, 'You are too much of a pussy to shoot me,'" Wilson told grand jurors. He said Brown grabbed the gun with his right hand, twisted it and "digs it into my hip."

After shots were fired in the vehicle, Brown fled and Wilson gave chase. At some point, Brown turned around to face the officer.

Witness accounts were conflicted about whether Brown walked, stumbled or charged back toward Wilson before he was fatally wounded, McCulloch said. There were also differing accounts of how or whether Brown's hands were raised. His body fell about 153 feet from Wilson's vehicle.

Thousands of people rallied — mostly peacefully — in other U.S. cities on Monday night, and President Barack Obama appealed for calm and understanding, pleading with both protesters and police to show restraint.

"We are a nation built on the rule of law, so we need to accept that this decision was the grand jury's to make," Obama said. He said it was understandable that some Americans would be angered, but echoed Brown's parents in calling for peaceful protests.

The Justice Department is conducting a separate investigation into possible civil rights violations that could result in federal charges, but investigators would need to satisfy a rigorous standard of proof in order to mount a prosecution. The department also has launched a broad probe into the Ferguson Police Department, looking for patterns of discrimination.

Regardless of the outcome of those investigations, Brown's family could also file a wrongful-death lawsuit against Wilson.

The Aug. 9 shooting heightened tensions in the predominantly black suburb that is patrolled by an overwhelmingly white police force. As Brown's body lay for hours in the center of a residential street, an angry crowd of onlookers gathered. Rioting and looting occurred the following night, and police responded with armored vehicles and tear gas.

Protests continued for weeks — often peacefully, but sometimes turning violent, with demonstrators throwing rocks and Molotov cocktails and police firing smoke canisters, tear gas and rubber bullets. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon briefly summoned the National Guard.

"Those are dreams," Johnson said. "Those are small-business owners, and we've torn those dreams away."

___

Link to grand jury documents: http://hosted.ap.org/specials/interactives/_documents/ferguson-shooting/.

___

Associated Press writers Alan Scher Zagier in Clayton, Andale Gross and Jim Suhr in Ferguson and Catherine Lucey in Des Moines, Iowa, contributed to this report. Follow David A. Lieb at: https://twitter.com/DavidALieb.


Rescue begins for Manatee in Chambers County

Seaworld of San Antonio is assisting state and local Wildlife officials in Chambers County in the rescue of a Manatee trapped in cold waters of Trinity Bay.

Two new videos of the manatee being lifted from the bay to the truck have been posted by Chambers Nature Tourism

You can view them  HERE and HERE

Clay Jacobs who has been helping the Chambers County with its tourism site www.ChambersWild.com said the rescue team of dozens of rescuers is trying to keep the public away from the site to protect the manatee.Jacob said the Manatee which Florida officials say winters in the Tampa Bay area, apparently took a swim and got caught up in warm currents of the Gulf and following them into Trinity Bay.  


When the hard freezes of last week came along, the Manatee found its way toward the cooling plant for an NRG generating station at the top part of Trinity Bay. The cooling plant uses cooler water to cool the electric generation, and the output is warmer water.

See this video of the Manatee posted on YouTube by ChambersWild.com

That station is a plant that is called upon to produce electricity in periods of high demand. The cold weather spiked electric use and the plant was operating.  When warmer weather came in the latter part of the week, the plant cut operations and the cooling plant was no longer putting out warm water.


Jacob and other officials whom KFDM talked to, said that the Manatee can not survive the cool 60 degree water of the Bay, for long. "His internal organs will start shutting down and he will have build up of oil in his liver -- he won't last long," Jacob said.

He said he has been in touch with the team of  savethemanatee.org/.   He said the manatee has been identified by Florida officials using scars on his body.  Manatees are sometimes struck by pleasure boat propellers in shallow waters causing unique scars.


That site notes that "Manatees are a migratory species. Within the United States, they are concentrated in Florida in the winter. In summer months, they can be found as far west as Texas and as far north as Massachusetts, but summer sightings in Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina are more common."

Average gasoline prices continue dropping as holiday approaches

BEAUMONT - The average price for one gallon of regular unleaded gasoline has dropped 6 cents this week in Beaumont, according to the weekly price survey released Tuesday by AAA Texas, but it's still higher than the average in any of the other cities surveyed.

 

The Beaumont average is $2.63. It was $3.07 at this time one year ago. The record average high in Beaumont is $4 a gallon in July 2008.

 

Amarillo has the lowest average in Texas at $2.49.

 

 

 

(Irving, TX) – From AAA Texas

 

The statewide average price for a gallon of regular unleaded fuel in Texas has dropped again before the start of the busy Thanksgiving holiday travel period.  Drivers are now paying $2.60 per gallon, according to the AAA Texas Weekend Gas Watch.  That price is eight cents less than one week ago and 53 cents less than one year ago.  Of the major metropolitan areas surveyed in the Lone Star State, drivers in Beaumont are paying the most at $2.63 per gallon while drivers in Amarillo are paying the least at $2.49 per gallon.  Nationally, drivers are paying an average of $2.81 per gallon which is 21 cents more than the average in Texas.

 

AAA Texas projects 3.6 million Texans will travel 50 miles or more from home during the Thanksgiving holiday travel period (Wednesday through Sunday).  That’s a 5.2 percent increase in travel volume from last year and the highest volume for the holiday since 2007.  Of the 3.6 million who will travel in the Lone Star State, 3.3 million will go by automobile.

 

“Those who will take road trips for the Thanksgiving holiday will appreciate the lower prices at the pump compared to years past,” said AAA Texas/New Mexico Representative Doug Shupe.  “We are enjoying these lower fuel prices as a result of global oil production exceeding demand and relatively few issues at local refineries,” said Shupe.

 

AAA Texas offers the following tips to keep road trips safe this holiday weekend:

 

  • Ensure your vehicle is properly maintained. If maintenance is not up to date, have your car and tires inspected before you take a long drive.
  • Map your route in advance and be prepared for busy roads. If possible, consider leaving earlier or later to avoid heavy traffic.
  • Get plenty of sleep (at least seven hours) the night before a long trip.
  • Keep doors locked, safety belts buckled and children in properly installed safety seats.
  • Obey the speed limit including work zones.
  • Don’t drive distracted by mobile devices, food, music or other passengers.
  • Don’t let gas tank fall below 1/3 tank.
  • Stay on main roads and highways and don’t forget your AAA mapping tools.
  • Pack a flashlight, blanket and first-aid kit.
  • When stopping for breaks, never let children go off alone and always lock vehicle doors.
  • Carry a mobile phone and car phone charger in case of emergencies.
  • Don’t stop to help a disabled vehicle but instead, call for help.
  • Never drink and drive.

 

To help members and non-members identify quality auto repair shops that can assist in the maintenance and repair of their vehicles, AAA offers the Approved Auto Repair program as a free public service.  AAA-approved repair facilities meet and maintain high professional standards for training, equipment, cleanliness and customer service. Motorists can look for the Approved Auto Repair sign at local auto repair facilities, or search for a nearby AAA-approved shop online at AAA.com/Repair.  AAA Texas branch offices throughout the state can be found by visiting www.AAA.com.  Follow AAA Texas on Twitter: @AAATexas and Facebook: www.facebook.com/AAATexas

 

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Workforce Solutions, Dupont SRW honored by TX Workforce Commission

Beaumont, TX (Nov. 25, 2014) – DuPont Sabine River Works received the Local Employer of Excellence Award for the Workforce Solutions Southeast Texas area at the recent Texas Workforce Commission’s (TWC) 18th Annual Texas Workforce Conference held earlier this month.


The Local Employer of Excellence Award honors private-sector employers that are actively involved with their local workforce board and have made a positive impact on employers, workers and the community.

DuPont operates in Orange, Texas. The refinery produces ethylene copolymers for packing and industrial applications and continually works with Workforce Solutions Southeast Texas to recruit and hire skilled workers, including veterans, for its high-growth, high-skilled jobs.


This year, DuPont collaborated with Workforce Solutions Southeast Texas and Lamar State College -- Orange to develop customized training for 458 incumbent workers and 61 new employees through TWC’s Skills Development Fund program. The training incorporated best health and safety industry practices and training in computer software applications and technical writing. 


The company is active in several community projects, including educating children about industry-related occupations through its Take your Sons and Daughters to Work initiative and providing hands-on education experiences for students through the Science Super Star Program.


DuPont subsidizes attendance to the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) convention for local science teachers. Additionally, DuPont sponsors educational sessions at the NSTA convention regarding the importance of environmental stewardship for more than 35,000 students and teachers.


“It’s through partnerships with community-minded employers such as DuPont Sabine River Works that we are able to help prepare local workers for today's job market and provide the skills needed for tomorrow's workplace" said Marilyn Smith, executive director of Workforce Solutions Southeast Texas.


"We appreciate and applaud their efforts and those of other employers who support workforce development efforts in our area.”


Workforce Solutions Southeast Texas also was recognized for outstanding board performance, receiving a $30,000 Performance Incentive Award for Claimant Reemployment. TWC Performance Incentive Awards recognize boards that display increased accountability and improved efficiencies. Monetary awards for achievement in these categories will be used to enhance workforce service programs during the next year.


About Workforce Solutions Southeast Texas


The Workforce Solutions Southeast Texas Board is a business-led group of volunteers that evaluates and oversees the delivery of all workforce training and employment services in Hardin, Jefferson and Orange Counties.


The board’s overall mission is to identify opportunities and create partnerships that effectively link employers and job seekers in order to improve the economic future of the area. Workforce Solutions Southeast Texas brings together a myriad of programs for easy access for employers and job seekers. For additional information, call 409-719-4750 or visit www.setworks.org.


About Texas Workforce Commission


The Texas Workforce Commission is a state agency dedicated to helping Texas employers, workers and communities prosper economically. For details on TWC and the programs it offers in coordination with its network of local workforce development boards, call 512-463-8942 or visit www.texasworkforce.org.

Jefferson County S.O. offers holiday safety tips

JEFFERSON COUNTY - From Jefferson County Sheriff's Office

The Thanksgiving Weekend is one of the most highly traveled times on our public roadways in the State of Texas with increased traffic as families take to the roads to celebrate the holidays. 


This time period is also marked with increased traffic collisions. The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office is committed to making the roadways safe during this Holiday Season. 


The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office will have increased patrol units on the roadways under the “Special Traffic Enforcement Program” under a grant from the Texas Department of Transportation.


The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office will be paying special attention to:

  •  The leading cause of accidents: Speed
  • The leading cause of injuries: Failure to wear safety belts
  • The leading cause of fatalities: Alcohol related collisions

Statistics show that alcohol impaired driving is at its peak during the Holiday Season and now is the time to get the message out. Alcohol is a factor in approximately 40% of all fatal motor vehicle crashes, and is the leading killer of young Americans. 


The Holiday Season is among the deadliest times of year on our nation’s highways, and alcohol impaired driving is a major contributor to these deadly events. Simply put “Drinking and Driving Kills”.


Those who celebrate the Holidays by drinking alcohol and then getting behind the wheel of a motor vehicle may find themselves behind bars.  Jefferson County Sheriff Mitch Woods, his deputies and all local law enforcement officers are warning holiday revelers, who drink to stay off the roadways.  


Sheriff Woods and his staff are committed in the effort to enforce D.W.I. Laws within Jefferson County with extra enforcement during the Holiday Season. Sheriff Woods is reminding everyone that there are many alternatives to “Drinking and Driving”.

 

We are asking that you help get the message out to the public. Please help us prevent a tragedy on our local roadways this Holiday Season. TAKE A STAND AGAINST IMPAIRED and DANGEROUS DRIVING


This Holiday Season Jefferson County will be a No-Refusal Season under the new no refusal initiative with the Jefferson County District Attorney’s Office. This means that a Judge will be available to sign a search warrant for a blood specimen if the driver refuses a breath specimen.


Some tips are:

  • If you are planning to drink alcohol with friends, designate a sober driver before going out don't wait until the end of the night to choose the "most sober" driver. A sober driver is someone who has had zero alcohol.
  • f you are impaired, do not drive — call a taxi, call a sober friend or family member to get you home safely or simply stay where you are;
  • If you know someone who is about to get behind the wheel or on a motorcycle after they have been drinking, take their keys — and find them a sober ride.

After Thanksgiving Zydeco Dance will lift your spirits, help community
The Knights of Peter Claver will be presenting a fun-raising, and fund-raising "After Thanksgiving Dance" at the Mother of Mercy Catholic Church, Friday, Nov. 28 from 9:00 to 12:00PM. Brian Jack and the Zydeco Gamblers with provide the musical entertainment.Lloyd Hebert and Delores Fulton bring the details.  The Knights of Peter Claver is the oldest Catholic Fraternal organization.

Grand Jury caps 3-month Ferguson case with no indictment

Photo: Chip Mitchell / Twitter / MGN 

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) — A grand jury has decided not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the death of Michael Brown, the unarmed, black 18-year-old whose fatal shooting sparked weeks of sometimes-violent protests.


St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Bob McCulloch announced the decision Monday evening. A grand jury of nine whites and three blacks had been meeting weekly since Aug. 20 to consider evidence. The panel met for 70 hours and heard from 60 witnesses.


McCulloch stressed that the grand jurors were "the only people who heard every witness ... and every piece of evidence." He said many witness presented conflicting statements that ultimately were inconsistent with the physical evidence.


"These grand jurors poured their hearts and soul into this process," he said.


As McCulloch was reading his statement, a crowd gathered around a car from which it was being broadcast on a stereo. When the decision was announced, Michael Brown's mother, Lesley McSpadden, who was sitting atop the car, burst into tears and began screaming before being whisked away by supporters.


The crowd erupted in anger, converging on the barricade where police in riot gear were standing. They pushed down the barricade and began pelting police with items, including a bullhorn. Police stood their ground.


At least nine votes would have been required to indict Wilson. The panel met in secret, a standard practice for such proceedings.


The Justice Department is conducting a separate investigation into possible civil rights violations that could result in federal charges. The department also has launched a broad probe into the Ferguson Police Department, looking for patterns of discrimination.


The Aug. 9 shooting inflamed tensions in the predominantly black St. Louis suburb that is patrolled by an overwhelmingly white police force. As Brown's body lay for hours in the center of a residential street, an angry crowd of onlookers gathered. Rioting and looting occurred the following night, and police responded with armored vehicles and tear gas.


Protests continued for weeks — often peacefully, but sometimes turning violent, with demonstrators throwing rocks and Molotov cocktails and police firing smoke canisters, tear gas and rubber bullets. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon to briefly summon the National Guard.


Hours before the announcement, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon urged people to remain peaceful as he appeared at a news conference with the state's public safety director and the leaders of St. Louis city and county.


"Our shared hope and expectation is that regardless of the decision, people on all sides show tolerance, mutual respect and restraint," Nixon said.


Some black leaders and Brown's parents questioned McCulloch's ability to be impartial. The prosecutor's father, mother, brother, uncle and cousin all worked for the St. Louis Police Department, and his father was killed while responding to a call involving a black suspect in 1964. McCulloch was 12 at the time, and the killing became a hallmark of his initial campaign for elected prosecutor.


Nixon declined to seek the removal of McCulloch in the Brown case, but he also called for McCulloch to vigorously prosecute Wilson, who had been on the Ferguson force for less than three years. Prior to that job, Wilson was an officer for nearly two years in Jennings, another St. Louis suburb.


McCulloch, a Democrat, has been in office since 1991 and was re-elected to another term earlier this month.


Among the cases that McCulloch's opponents cited as examples of pro-police bias was the 2000 shooting death of two men in a fast-food parking lot by two undercover drug officers in the town of Berkeley, which like Ferguson is a predominantly black suburb in what locals call North County.


A federal investigation determined that Earl Murray and Ronald Beasley were unarmed and that their car had not moved forward when the officers fired 21 shots. But that inquiry also determined that the shootings were justified since the officers feared for their lives.


McCulloch opted to not prosecute the two officers and characterized the victims as "bums" who "spread destruction in the community" by selling drugs.


___

Associated Press writers Alan Scher Zagier in Clayton and Andale Gross in Ferguson contributed to this report. Follow David A. Lieb at: https://twitter.com/DavidALieb.


Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Current 11/25/14

11/18/14

Difference

Year Ago 11/25/13

Difference

Record High Date

Record High Price

National

$2.81

$2.87

-0.06

$3.28

-0.47

07/17/08

$4.11

State

$2.60

$2.68

-0.08

$3.13

-0.53

07/17/08

$3.98

Amarillo

$2.49

$2.59

-0.10

$2.99

-0.50

07/16/08

$3.98

Austin-San Marcos

$2.59

$2.66

-0.07

$3.13

-0.54

07/17/08

$3.97

Beaumont

$2.63

$2.69

-0.06

$3.07

-0.44

07/16/08

$4.00

Corpus Christi

$2.60

$2.69

-0.09

$3.13

-0.53

07/15/08

$3.96

Dallas

$2.55

$2.65

-0.10

$3.20

-0.65

07/16/08

$3.98

El Paso

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$2.61

-0.07

$3.03

-0.49

07/17/08

$3.97

Ft. Worth

$2.55

$2.64

-0.09

$3.20

-0.65

07/16/08

$3.97

Galveston

$2.57

$2.63

-0.06

$3.11

-0.54

07/14/08

$3.97

Houston

$2.62

$2.69

-0.07

$3.12

-0.50

07/17/08

$3.96

San Antonio

$2.57

$2.66

-0.09

$3.10

-0.53

07/16/08

$3.96

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    On News @ Noon every other Thursday - Doctors and Senior Care Givers will discuss anything and everything to do with health issues of senior citizens.
  • KFDM :: News - 6 on Health

    6 on Health

    6 On Health Stories
  • KFDM :: News - Ask the Docs

    Ask the Docs

    Ask The Doc
  • KFDM :: News - Restaurant Report Card

    Restaurant Report Card

    Resturant Report Card stories
  • KFDM :: News - Town Hall

    Town Hall

    Join in as our expert panel discusses government reform in Texas.
  • KFDM :: News - Waste Watch

    Waste Watch

    How are your tax dollars being spent? Waste Watch tracks whether local, state and federal governments or any groups are using your money wisely...or wasting it.
  • KFDM :: News - Raw News

    Raw News

    Watch extra news footage, full interviews, & extended stories that didn't make it on air.
  • KFDM :: News - See It

    See It

    Did you catch that incredible sunset? Do you have a photo for your adorable child or pet? Did you snap a picture of breaking news?
  • KFDM :: News - Washington Times

    Washington Times

    Politics, Breaking News, US and World News.
  • KFDM :: News - Health Care Reform

    Health Care Reform

    The Supreme Court ruling to uphold the Affordable Care Act sparked a new battle. Check here daily for the latest developments, locally and across the country.
  • KFDM :: News - Remembering Bill

    Remembering Bill

    Remembering our friend & colleague Bill Leger.Watch KFDM videos, view photos and send us your thoughts and prayers

more »

 

Tonight on KFDM Channel 6

6:00 -
KFDM 6 evening news
6:30 -
WHEEL OF FORTUNE
7:00
ComedyTime
7:30-
ComedyTime
8:00 -
CrimeTime
9:00-
48 Hours Mystery
10:00 -
KFDM 6 NEWS tonight

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